Improving Access to Mammography in an Urban Underserved Area

Institution: Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science
Investigator(s): Bruce Allen, DrPH -
Award Cycle: 1996 (Cycle II) Grant #: 2RB-0204 Award: $520,005
Award Type: Research Project Awards
Research Priorities
Detection, Prognosis and Treatment>Imaging, Biomarkers, and Molecular Pathology: improving detection and diagnosis



Initial Award Abstract (1996)
One of the CBCRP’s priority areas is a focus on research that can specifically benefit underserved populations. This priority coincides perfectly with the mission of the Charles R. Drew University—to conduct medical education and research in the context of service to a defined population so as to train persons to provide care with competence and compassion to this and other underserved populations. This study will improve and expand the earlier detection of breast cancer for a currently underserved urban population by developing more effective, low-cost interventions in a manner which may be used for other underserved areas throughout the state.

The Charles R. Drew University Cancer Center and the UCLA-Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have come together to collaboratively conduct a three-year study of how to increase the use of screening mammography among African American and Latino women. The purposes of the study are to: 1) determine the prevalence of screening mammography in African American and Latino women 40 years old or older who reside in the King/Drew Medical Center South Central Los Angeles service area; and 2) implement and evaluate the effectiveness of using a culturally-specific telephone intervention designed to increase participants' self-efficacy, increase their knowledge about the importance of regular mammograms, identify and modify their intentions to undergo screening, and provide women with information to counter their reasons for not having a mammogram.


Final Report (1999)
The Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and the UCLA-Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center are collaborating on a three-year study of how to increase the use of screening mammography among African American and Latino women. Nearly 1,300 women responded to our telephone survey (random digit dialing) conducted during Years 1 & 2. That survey was done to: (1 ) find out how often women living in the King/Drew Medical Center Service Area get screening mammograms; (2) learn about their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors concerning breast cancer and mammograms; and (3) pre-qualify respondents for random assignment to the intervention or the comparison group.

Nine hundred and twenty (923) women 40 years old or older qualified for the study and we successfully enrolled 430 of them during the third year to test the effectiveness of our tailored telephonic interventions (encouragement) of women to get mammograms. The interventions were developed using focus groups of African American and Latino women. These interventions were deemed to be ethnically/culturally appropriate and were designed to overcome objections to getting screening mammograms.

More than 80% of the first 505 women who responded to our telephone survey reported that they had had screening mammograms within the last two years prior to our call.

After our initial survey, 430 women were enrolled in our study. All of these women have or will receive at least three telephone calls on behalf of our study. The first call is to pre-qualify them for the study; the second is to enroll and randomly assign the qualified respondents to the intervention or comparison group; and the third call is to assess if our interventions (encouragement) are successful in motivating women to get mammograms. Presently, all women have received the first and second calls and approximately 95% of them have received the third call. The third calls are made approximately six months after the second call to find out how many women had gotten mammograms. Preliminary analyses indicate that our calling appear to be effective in increasing the prevalence of screening mammography among African Americans and Latinos.

Assessing Screening Mammography Utilization in an Urban Area
Periodical:Journal of the National Medical Association
Index Medicus: J Nat Med Assn
Authors: Allen B, Bastani R, Bazargan S, Leonard E
Yr: 2002 Vol: 94 Nbr: 1 Abs: Pg:5-14